Site Logo
Looking for girlfriend or boyfriend > Blacks > Books on male victims of domestic violence

Books on male victims of domestic violence

Site Logo

Phil does an excellent job of walking through the statistics and studies, and brings it home with the point that the actual percentages are not important. What is important is that there are a lot of battered men out there, and they are being ignored. The strength of the book, is in the compelling and convincing personal stories. The book is very pro-active. He outlines clearly and effectively what these men need if we are to help them and if we are to have a truly gender-neutral domestic violence response system that meets the needs of people who are victims of domestic violence.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Billboard about male victims of domestic violence draws attention

Content:
SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: My Experience With Domestic Violence

Male Victims of Domestic Abuse

Site Logo

Domestic violence against men isn't always easy to identify, but it can be a serious threat. Know how to recognize if you're being abused — and how to get help. Women aren't the only victims of domestic violence. Understand the signs of domestic violence against men, and know how to get help.

Domestic violence — also known as intimate partner violence — occurs between people who are or have been in a close relationship. Domestic violence can take many forms, including emotional, sexual and physical abuse, stalking and threats of abuse. It can happen in heterosexual or same-sex relationships.

Abusive relationships always involve an imbalance of power and control. An abuser uses intimidating, hurtful words and behaviors to control his or her partner. It might not be easy to recognize domestic violence against men. Early in the relationship, your partner might seem attentive, generous and protective in ways that later turn out to be controlling and frightening. Initially, the abuse might appear as isolated incidents. Your partner might apologize and promise not to abuse you again.

If you're gay, bisexual or transgender, you might also be experiencing domestic violence if you're in a relationship with someone who:. You may not be sure whether you're the victim or the abuser. It's common for survivors of domestic violence to act out verbally or physically against the abuser, yelling, pushing, or hitting him or her during conflicts.

The abuser may use such incidents to manipulate you, describing them as proof that you are the abusive partner. You may have developed unhealthy behaviors. Many survivors do. That doesn't mean you are at fault for the abuse. If you're having trouble identifying what's happening, take a step back and look at larger patterns in your relationship.

Then, review the signs of domestic violence. In an abusive relationship, the person who routinely uses these behaviors is the abuser. The person on the receiving end is being abused. Even if you're still not sure, seek help. Intimate partner violence causes physical and emotional damage — no matter who is at fault. Domestic violence affects children, even if no one is physically attacking them. If you have children, remember that being exposed to domestic violence makes them more likely to have developmental problems, psychiatric disorders, problems at school, aggressive behavior and low self-esteem.

You might worry that seeking help could further endanger you and your children, or that it might break up your family. Fathers might fear that abusive partners will try to take their children away from them.

However, getting help is the best way to protect your children — and yourself. Domestic violence can leave you depressed and anxious, and can increase your risk of having a drug or alcohol problem.

Because men are traditionally thought to be physically stronger than women, you might be less likely to report domestic violence in your heterosexual relationship due to embarrassment. You might also worry that people will minimize the importance of the abuse because you're a man. Similarly, a man being abused by another man might be reluctant to talk about the problem because of how it reflects on his masculinity or because it exposes his sexual orientation.

If you seek help, you also might find that there are fewer resources for male victims of domestic violence. Health care providers and other contacts might not think to ask if your injuries were caused by domestic violence, making it harder to open up about abuse.

You might fear that if you talk to someone about the abuse, you'll be accused of wrongdoing yourself. Remember, though, if you're being abused, you aren't to blame — and help is available.

Start by telling someone about the abuse, whether it's a friend, relative, health care provider or other close contact. At first, you might find it hard to talk about the abuse. However, you'll also likely feel relief and receive much-needed support.

An abuser can use technology to monitor your telephone and online communication and to track your physical location. If you're concerned for your safety, seek help. To maintain your privacy:. In an emergency, call — or your local emergency number or law enforcement agency. The following resources also can help:.

Domestic violence against men can have devastating effects. Although you may not be able to stop your partner's abusive behavior, you can seek help. Remember, no one deserves to be abused. Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. Advertising revenue supports our not-for-profit mission. Any use of this site constitutes your agreement to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy linked below. A single copy of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial personal use only.

This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here. This content does not have an English version. This content does not have an Arabic version. Make an appointment.

Visit now. Explore now. Choose a degree. Get updates. Give today. Request Appointment. Healthy Lifestyle Adult health. Products and services. Free E-newsletter Subscribe to Housecall Our general interest e-newsletter keeps you up to date on a wide variety of health topics. Sign up now.

Domestic violence Domestic violence against men isn't always easy to identify, but it can be a serious threat. By Mayo Clinic Staff. Show references Breiding MJ, et al. Accessed Dec. Goldman L, et al. Intimate partner violence. In: Goldman-Cecil Medicine. Elsevier; Weil A. Intimate partner violence: Diagnosis and screening. Same-sex relationship violence. Department of Health and Human Services. Beck BJ. Niolon PH, et al. Preventing intimate partner violence across the lifespan: A technical package of programs, policies, and practices.

Calton JM, et al. Barriers to help seeking for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer survivors of intimate partner violence. Ready, willing and able? A survey of clinicians' perceptions about domestic violence screening in a regional hospital emergency department.

Australasian Emergency Nursing Journal. Harris BA. Digital coercive control: Insights from two landmark domestic violence studies. British Journal of Criminology. Office on Women's Health. Mayo Clinic; See also Domestic violence against women Forgiveness Have questions about sex? Ask your doctor Better communication tips Infidelity Stepfamilies. Mayo Clinic Marketplace Check out these best-sellers and special offers on books and newsletters from Mayo Clinic.

Reprint Permissions A single copy of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial personal use only.

Violence Against Men in Intimate Relationships

When most people think of domestic violence, images of battered women or abused children come to mind. But there is another side to this issue that is not as familiar--abused men. This unique book is the first to comprehensively examine this important but neglected social issue. Already praised by a diverse spectrum of readers--from Dear Abby's Abigail Van Buren, to the nation's leading domestic violence researcher, to those in law enforcement and counseling--this work is sure to spark controversy and discussion.

All calls are free and confidential. Our advocates offer the same support through our live chat services. Your safety is our priority, so all phone calls and chats are completely confidential.

NCBI Bookshelf. Martin R. Huecker ; William Smock. Authors Martin R. Huecker 1 ; William Smock 2.

Follow the Author

Domestic violence against men isn't always easy to identify, but it can be a serious threat. Know how to recognize if you're being abused — and how to get help. Women aren't the only victims of domestic violence. Understand the signs of domestic violence against men, and know how to get help. Domestic violence — also known as intimate partner violence — occurs between people who are or have been in a close relationship. Domestic violence can take many forms, including emotional, sexual and physical abuse, stalking and threats of abuse. It can happen in heterosexual or same-sex relationships. Abusive relationships always involve an imbalance of power and control. An abuser uses intimidating, hurtful words and behaviors to control his or her partner. It might not be easy to recognize domestic violence against men.

Books of Interest

Men who experience domestic violence and abuse face significant barriers to getting help and access to specialist support services, according to a study by researchers at the University of Bristol's Centre for Academic Primary Care and Centre for Gender and Violence Research published in BMJ Open today [Wednesday 12 June]. The study, funded by the National Institute for Health Research, looked at what stops men in abusive relationships from seeking help and how services could be improved to make help-seeking easier. The researchers analysed interview-based studies of men in heterosexual and same-sex relationships and organised their findings into a series of themes. Fear of not being believed or being accused as the perpetrator, embarrassment at talking about the abuse, and feeling 'less of a man' were found to be key reasons why men did not seek help. Men also worried about the welfare of their partner, damaging their relationship or losing contact with their children if they opened up to someone outside their personal network of family and friends.

But there is another side to this issue that is not as familiar--abused men.

Every year in the United States about 3. Many are minor incidents pushing, slapping or hitting , though many are more serious and some fatal. Men are reluctant to report abuse because they fear no one will believe them. Abuse towards men is hard to grasp.

Male victims of domestic abuse face significant barriers to getting help

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read.

The first edition of Philip W. On the 10th anniversary of that groundbreaking book, Cook began revising and expanding his work. The new edition of Abused Men: The Hidden Side of Domestic Violence offers up-to-date data on the prevalence of intimate partner violence against men, incorporating personal interviews and cases drawn from the media. It also includes updates on law, legislation, court activity, social responses, police activity, support groups, batterer programs, and crisis intervention programs. The final chapter contains a detailed and specific description of needed reforms in the current approach to intimate partner violence, whether the victims are male or female.

Abused Men: The Hidden Side of Domestic Violence

We've organized a library of books for you on the domestic violence and abuse topics listed below. Click on the topic that interests you to see the books, a book description and a way to purchase, if you like. If you are an author and would like us to consider adding your book please read our guidelines. Helping kids set healthy boundaries for their private parts can be a daunting and awkward task for parents, counselors and educators. Written from a kid's point of view, I Said No!

Abused Men. The issue of domestic violence is generally considered to be an act in which women are the victims. And while it is true women are much more.

Oftentimes, when you are casting about for a subject for a new book, life can give you a little nudge. In the case of my latest novel, A Suitable Lie, it gave me several. One occurred in early when I heard the topic of male spousal abuse being discussed on the radio.

Michael J Malone: taking male spousal abuse seriously

Philip W. Cook is an investigative journalist who has won awards from the Associated Press and the Society of Professional Journalists. Say the words "domestic violence," and images of battered women come to mind. Yet the more accurate picture is different, and it crosses genders.

Abused Men

In this introductory chapter we present the ambitions, objectives and structure of this book. We define what violence in intimate relationships is and offer some insight into the contemporary theoretical debates on violence in intimate relationships, as set out by sociologist Michael P. It is a common assumption that men are only exposed to violence in the public space, while women are exposed to violence in intimate relationships.

When most people think of domestic violence, images of battered women or abused children come to mind.

.

Domestic Violence Books

.

Domestic Violence

.

Comments: 0
  1. No comments yet.

Thanks! Your comment will appear after verification.
Add a comment

© 2020 Online - Advisor on specific issues.