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Have friendly behaviour

Friendly people are always excited to meet new people and appear approachable to friends and acquaintances. They are the kind of people who can just start chatting to a person on an airplane, in line at the drugstore, or when they're stuck on the bus. Sound hard? It doesn't have to be.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Half Life Mr. Friendly Behavior

Content:
SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: 7 Traits of a Strong Personality Any Person Can Develop

11 Tips For Being A Bit More Friendly In Everyday Life

Companies that introduce sustainable offerings face a frustrating paradox: Most consumers report positive attitudes toward eco-friendly products and services, but they often seem unwilling to follow through with their wallets.

The authors have been studying how to encourage sustainable consumption for several years, performing their own experiments and reviewing research in marketing, economics, and psychology. Synthesizing these insights, the authors identify five approaches for companies to consider: use social influence, shape good habits, leverage the domino effect, talk to the heart or the brain, and favor experiences over ownership. Most consumers report positive attitudes toward eco-friendly products and services, but they often seem unwilling to pay for them.

Insights from behavioral science can help close this gap. Consider five approaches: use social influence, shape good habits, leverage the domino effect, decide whether to talk to the heart or the brain, and favor experiences over ownership. The good news is that sustainable choices often lead to further positive behavior. On the surface, there has seemingly never been a better time to launch a sustainable offering.

Consumers—particularly Millennials—increasingly say they want brands that embrace purpose and sustainability. Indeed, one recent report revealed that certain categories of products with sustainability claims showed twice the growth of their traditional counterparts. Yet a frustrating paradox remains at the heart of green business: Few consumers who report positive attitudes toward eco-friendly products and services follow through with their wallets.

People are influenced to install solar panels by near neighbors who have done so. We have been studying how to encourage sustainable consumption for several years, performing our own experiments and reviewing research in marketing, economics, and psychology.

Much of the research has focused on public interventions by policy makers—but the findings can be harnessed by any organization that wishes to nudge consumers toward sustainable purchasing and behavior. Synthesizing these insights, we have identified five actions for companies to consider: use social influence, shape good habits, leverage the domino effect, decide whether to talk to the heart or the brain, and favor experiences over ownership. In the city of Calgary, Alberta, had a problem.

The city had created an informational campaign about the program that highlighted its benefits: Grasscycling would return valuable nutrients to the soil, protect the lawn, and help the soil retain moisture. But initial adoption rates were lower than the city had expected. Scores of studies have shown that humans have a strong desire to fit in and will conform to the behavior of those around them.

Harnessing the power of social influence is one of the most effective ways to elicit pro-environmental behaviors in consumption as well. Telling buffet diners that the norm was to not take too much at once and that it was OK to return for seconds decreased food waste by A major predictor of whether people will install solar panels is whether their close-by neighbors have done so. And, in perhaps the most dramatic finding, telling university students that other commuters were ditching their cars in favor of more-sustainable modes of transportation such as cycling led them to use sustainable transport five times as often as did those who were simply given information about alternatives.

Sometimes social motivators can backfire, however. If only a few people are engaging in a sustainable behavior, it may appear to be not socially approved of, thus discouraging adoption.

In such instances companies can enlist advocates to promote the positive elements of the product or action. Advocates are most compelling when they themselves have undertaken the behavior. Social norms may also turn off certain consumer segments. For example, some men associate sustainability with femininity, leading them to avoid sustainable options. But if a brand is already strongly associated with masculinity, this effect can be mitigated.

Because the company sells waste products and unused resources to other industries, it sends zero waste to landfills. And whiskey fans can buy used charcoal from the mellowing vats in the form of barbecue briquettes for grilling at home, reaffirming traditional masculine values.

To avoid losing its standing as a rugged, masculine brand, it has expertly integrated sustainability into its existing branding. In another example, people who lean right on the political spectrum are sometimes less open to engaging in eco-friendly behaviors because they associate them with a liberal political ideology.

Your actions help us to do our civic duty because recycling is the responsible thing to do in our society. Because of people like you, we can follow the advice of important leaders by recycling. You CAN join the fight! Another solution is to focus on values that everyone shares, such as family, community, prosperity, and security.

Consumers often have negative associations with sustainable product options, viewing them as being of lower quality, less aesthetically pleasing, and more expensive. In one example, when people valued strength in a product—a car cleaner, say—they were less likely to choose sustainable options. For example, Tesla focuses on the innovative design and functional performance of its cars more than on their green credentials—a message that resonates with its target market. This also helps overcome the concern of some men that green products are feminine.

Social influence can be turbocharged in three ways. The first is by simply making sustainable behaviors more evident to others. The sustainable option was twice as likely to be chosen when others were present than when the choice was made in private. Other researchers have found similar effects with products ranging from eco-friendly hand sanitizers to high-efficiency automobiles.

A third approach is to use healthy competition between social groups. When the World Wildlife Fund and its partner volunteer organizations wanted to raise awareness about sustainable actions for Earth Hour, a global lights-off event, they spearheaded friendly energy-saving competitions between cities.

The program has spread through social diffusion: It began in Sydney, Australia, in and now reaches countries, with 3. Humans are creatures of habit. Many behaviors, such as how we commute to work, what we buy, what we eat, and how we dispose of products and packaging, are part of our regular routines.

Often the key to spreading sustainable consumer behaviors is to first break bad habits and then encourage good ones. Habits are triggered by cues found in familiar contexts. For example, using disposable coffee cups a habit repeated a staggering billion times a year across the globe may be a response to cues, such as the default cup provided by the barista and a trash bin illustrated with a picture of a cup, both common in coffee shops.

Companies can use design features to eliminate negative habits and substitute positive ones. The simplest and probably most effective approach is to make sustainable behavior the default option. In other cases, making green options—such as reusing towels or receiving electronic rather than paper bank statements—the default increased uptake of the more sustainable option. In full-service restaurants in California, drinks no longer come with plastic straws; customers must explicitly request one.

Another strategy is to make the desired action easier—by, for example, placing recycling bins nearby, requiring less complex sorting of recyclables, or providing free travel cards for public transport. Three subtle techniques can help shape positive habits: using prompts, providing feedback, and offering incentives.

Prompts might be text messages reminding people to engage in desired behaviors, such as cycling, jogging, or commuting in some other eco-friendly way to work. Prompts work best when they are easy to understand and received where the behavior will take place, and when people are motivated to engage in the behavior.

Feedback sometimes tells people how they performed alone and sometimes compares their performance to that of others. If the behavior is repeatedly performed—driving a car in varying traffic conditions, for example—real-time feedback like what the Toyota Prius offers drivers about their gas mileage can be effective. Adopting a sustainable behavior makes people apt to make other positive changes. Incentives can take any number of forms.

Incentives should be used with care, because if they are removed, the desired behavior may disappear too. One of the benefits of encouraging consumers to form desirable habits is that it can create positive spillover: People like to be consistent, so if they adopt one sustainable behavior, they are often apt to make other positive changes in the future. The company found that although people may begin with a single step—such as reducing household food waste—they often move on to act in other domains, such as energy conservation.

IKEA observed a snowball effect as well: People would begin with small actions and build to more meaningful ones. For example, buying LED light bulbs might lead to wearing warmer clothing and turning down the thermostat, changing curtains and blinds to decrease heat loss, insulating doors and windows, buying energy-efficient appliances, installing a programmable thermostat, and so on.

It is important to remember that negative spillover can occur too: A sustainable action may lead someone to subsequently behave less sustainably. Termed licensing by researchers, this occurs when a consumer feels that an initial ethical action confers permission to behave less virtuously in the future. In one example, researchers found that people who had performed a virtual green shopping task were less likely to behave prosocially in a game they were less likely to help others by allocating resources than those who had performed a virtual conventional shopping task.

In other examples, people use more paper when they can show that they are recycling and use more of a product such as mouthwash, glass cleaner, or hand sanitizer when it is a sustainable one.

Similarly, car models with increased fuel efficiency may lead people to drive more miles, and more-efficient home heating and cooling systems may lead them to increase usage.

Hope and pride can be particularly useful in driving sustainable consumption. Companies can take steps to lessen the risk of negative spillover. They can ensure that the first sustainable action is particularly effortful, which seems to build commitment.

When consumers are asked to make smaller commitments, it is best not to publicize those actions, because that may lead to something researchers call slacktivism. However, those who privately joined a Facebook group or signed a petition were more likely to see the cause as reflecting their true values and to follow through.

Note that this differs from the earlier example of giving pins to hotel guests who choose energy-efficient options, because in that study wearing a pin was explicitly tied to a commitment to perform a sustainable action. Someone who sees a token initial behavior as engagement in a cause often performs fewer positive actions in the future. How companies communicate with consumers has an enormous influence on the adoption of sustainable behaviors.

When getting ready to launch or promote a product or a campaign, marketers often have a choice between emotional levers and rational arguments.

Either can be effective—but only if certain conditions are met. People are more likely to engage in a behavior when they derive positive feelings from doing so.

This core precept is often overlooked when it comes to sustainability, for which ad campaigns are likely to emphasize disturbing warnings. Research has found that hope and pride are particularly useful in driving sustainable consumption. Bacardi and Lonely Whale cultivate hope in their collaboration to eliminate one billion single-use plastic straws, and they use the hashtag thefuturedoesntsuck to promote events and call for consumer action.

Guilt is a more complicated emotional tool. Research by White and colleagues suggests that it can be an effective motivator but should be used carefully. Indeed, an abundance of other research confirms that activating moderate amounts of guilt, sadness, or fear, is more effective than trying to elicit a strong reaction.

This research suggests that charity or cause appeals that use particularly emotive images such as explicit images of suffering children may not be as effective as less heavy-handed ones. In Unilever launched a campaign to draw attention to the fact that although some palm oil harvesting leads to rain forest destruction, its palm oil is all sustainably farmed. Small actions, big difference. Thus one key to marketing a sustainable product is communicating what effect its use will have on the environment.

Although information about sustainable behaviors and their outcomes can be persuasive, how the information is framed is critical, especially for products with high up-front costs and delayed benefits. For instance, photos showing how glaciers have receded can be a powerful means of conveying environmental losses associated with climate change.

Why Acting Environmentally-Friendly Feels Good: Exploring the Role of Self-Image

Companies that introduce sustainable offerings face a frustrating paradox: Most consumers report positive attitudes toward eco-friendly products and services, but they often seem unwilling to follow through with their wallets. The authors have been studying how to encourage sustainable consumption for several years, performing their own experiments and reviewing research in marketing, economics, and psychology. Synthesizing these insights, the authors identify five approaches for companies to consider: use social influence, shape good habits, leverage the domino effect, talk to the heart or the brain, and favor experiences over ownership. Most consumers report positive attitudes toward eco-friendly products and services, but they often seem unwilling to pay for them. Insights from behavioral science can help close this gap.

Recent research suggests that engagement in environmentally-friendly behavior can feel good. Current explanations for such a link do not focus on the nature of environmentally-friendly behavior itself, but rather propose well-being is more or less a side-benefit; behaviors that benefit environmental quality e. We propose that the moral nature of environmentally-friendly behavior itself may elicit positive emotions as well, because engaging in this behavior can signal one is an environmentally-friendly and thus a good person.

If becoming like this is one of your goals, here are some general pointers on how to act like a more friendly, social person. A quickie definition of 'friendly' could be being nice to, and interested in, other people. I'd define 'social' as spending a fair amount of time with other people and enjoying it. The points in this article describe behaviors. If someone is naturally in a mood where they like people and are interested in everyone, many of the actions below will come naturally to them.

The Elusive Green Consumer

Friendliness gets a bad rap these days. So often, we view the smiling, sweet, chatty person as kind of dimwitted, or vulnerable, or even fake. But despite the fact it can freak people out, I honestly think we should all be more friendly in everyday life. Because, no matter what the mean critics say, friendliness is a wonderful quality to have. Not only does it make other people happy, but it can make life better for you, as well. Think about getting ahead at work yes, even in cutthroat offices , having more fun on dates, and attracting all sorts of super caring friends. Seriously, being lovely and warmhearted is what we should all strive for — if not always, then at least some of the time.

How To Be More Friendly And Social

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Comprehensive list of synonyms for friendly, by Macmillan Dictionary and friendly and pleasant, especially to someone who has just arrived at a place.

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Comments: 4
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