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Old man and the sea love quotes

Quote 1: "Everything about him was old except his eyes and they were the same color as the sea and were cheerful and undefeated. Quote 2: "There are many good fishermen and some great ones. But there is only one you. Quote 3: "He no longer dreamed of storms, nor of women , nor of great occurrences, nor of great fish, nor fights, nor contests of strength, nor of his wife. He only dreamed of places now and of the lions on the beach. They played like young cats in the dusk and he loved them as he loved the boy.

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The Old Man and the Sea

JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. Everything about him was old except his eyes and they were the same color as the sea and were cheerful and undefeated.

Usually when he smelled the land breeze he woke up and dressed to go and wake the boy. But tonight the smell of the land breeze came very early and he knew it was too early in his dream and went on dreaming to see the white peaks of the Islands rising from the sea and then he dreamed of the different harbours and roadsteads of the Canary Islands. He no longer dreamed of storms, nor of women, nor of great occurrences, nor of great fish, nor fights, nor contests of strength, nor of his wife.

He only dreamed of places now and of the lions on the beach. They played like young cats in the dusk and he loved them as he loved the boy. He never dreamed about the boy. All my life the early sun has hurt my eyes, he thought. Yet they are still good. In the evening I can look straight into it without getting the blackness. It has more force in the evening too. But in the morning it is painful. As he watched the bird dipped again slanting his wings for the dive and then swinging them wildly and ineffectually as he followed the flying fish.

The old man could see the slight bulge in the water that the big dolphin raised as they followed the escaping fish. The dolphin were cutting through the water below the flight of the fish and would be in the water, driving at speed, when the fish dropped. It is a big school of dolphin, he thought. They are widespread and the flying fish have little chance. The bird has no chance. The flying fish are too big for him and they go too fast.

The old man notices aspects of the flying fish that are later reflected in his own marlin; this equates him with the birds he watches.

He could not see the green of the shore now but only the tops of the blue hills that showed white as though they were snow-capped and the clouds that looked like high snow mountains above them. The sea was very dark and the light made prisms in the water. The myriad flecks of the plankton were annulled now by the high sun and it was only the great deep prisms in the blue water that the old man saw now with his lines going straight down into the water that was a mile deep.

The old man knew he was going far out and he left the smell of the land behind and rowed out into the clean early morning smell of the ocean. He saw the phosphorescence of the Gulf weed in the water as he rowed over the part of the ocean that the fishermen called the great well because there was a sudden deep of seven hundred fathoms where all sorts of fish congregated because of the swirl the current made against the steep walls of the floor of the ocean.

Here there were concentrations of shrimp and bait fish and sometimes schools of squid in the deepest holes and these rose close to the surface at night where all the wandering fish fed on them. The old man notices much about the world around him, and is greatly involved with the sea and its creatures. He always thought of the sea as la mar which is what people call her in Spanish when they love her.

Sometimes those who love her say bad things of her but they are always said as though she were a woman. Some of the younger fishermen, those who used buoys as floats for their lines and had motorboats, bought when the shark livers had brought much money, spoke of her as el mar which is masculine. They spoke of her as a contestant or a place or even an enemy.

But the old man always thought of her as feminine and as something that gave or withheld great favours, and if she did wild or wicked things it was because she could not help them. The moon affects her as it does a woman, he thought. The old man holds a respect and reverence for the ocean that differentiates him from other fishermen.

In the dark the old man could feel the morning coming and as he rowed he heard the trembling sound as flying fish left the water and the hissing that their stiff set wings made as they soared away in the darkness. He was very fond of flying fish as they were his principal friends on the ocean.

He was sorry for the birds, especially the small delicate dark terns that were always flying and looking and almost never finding, and he thought, the birds have a harder life than we do except for the robber birds and the heavy strong ones. Why did they make birds so delicate and fine as those sea swallows when the ocean can be so cruel? She is kind and very beautiful. But she can be so cruel and it comes so suddenly and such birds that fly, dipping and hunting, with their small sad voices are made too delicately for the sea.

That the old man makes friends with the creatures of the sea makes palpable his isolation from other people. He loved green turtles and hawk-bills with their elegance and speed and their great value and he had a friendly contempt for the huge, stupid loggerheads, yellow in their armour-plating, strange in their love-making, and happily eating the Portuguese men-of-war with their eyes shut.

The old man imposes value and judgment on the creatures of the sea. He has made it his own world. The iridescent bubbles were beautiful. But they were the falsest thing in the sea and the old man loved to see the big sea turtles eating them.

The turtles saw them, approached them from the front, then shut their eyes so they were completely carapaced and ate them filaments and all.

The old man loved to see the turtles eat them and he loved to walk on them on the beach after a storm and hear them pop when he stepped on them with the horny soles of his feet. What the old man loves and what he hates in the natural world may provide insight into his character. During the night two porpoises came around the boat and he could hear them rolling and blowing.

He could tell the difference between the blowing noise the male made and the sighing blow of the female. They are our brothers like the flying fish. That the old man finds friends in the creatures of the ocean makes palpable his isolation from other people. Perhaps I should not have been a fisherman, he thought. But that was the thing that I was born for. The old man believes that his own life as a fisherman is as much the natural order of things as the sharks eating his fish later on. Just before it was dark, as they passed a great island of Sargasso weed that heaved and swung in the light sea as though the ocean were making love with something under a yellow blanket, his small line was taken by a dolphin.

He saw it first when it jumped in the air, true gold in the last of the sun and bending and flapping wildly in the air. It jumped again and again in the acrobatics of its fear and he worked his way back to the stern and crouching and holding the big line with his right hand and arm, he pulled the dolphin in with his left hand, stepping on the gained line each time with his bare left foot.

When the fish was at the stem, plunging and cutting from side to side in desperation, the old man leaned over the stern and lifted the burnished gold fish with its purple spots over the stem. Its jaws were working convulsively in quick bites against the hook and it pounded the bottom of the skiff with its long flat body, its tail and its head until he clubbed it across the shining golden head until it shivered and was still.

After that he began to dream of the long yellow beach and he saw the first of the lions come down onto it in the early dark and then the other lions came and he rested his chin on the wood of the bows where the ship lay anchored with the evening off-shore breeze and he waited to see if there would be more lions and he was happy. This is the second day now that I do not know the result of the juegos , he thought.

But I must have confidence and I must be worthy of the great DiMaggio who does all things perfectly even with the pain of the bone spur in his heel. What is a bone spur? Un espuela de hueso. We do not have them. I do not think I could endure that or the loss of the eye and of both eyes and continue to fight as the fighting cocks do. Man is not much beside the great birds and beasts. Still I would rather be that beast down there in the darkness of the sea.

Which is worse, he wonders. He looked at the sky and saw the white cumulus built like friendly piles of ice cream and high above were the thin feathers of the cirrus against the high September sky. The old man gains confidence by examining the conditions in the natural world. He did not dream of the lions but instead of a vast school of porpoises that stretched for eight or ten miles and it was in the time of their mating and they would leap high into the air and return into the same hole they had made in the water when they leaped.

Besides, he thought, everything kills everything else in some way. Fishing kills me exactly as it keeps me alive. The boy keeps me alive, he thought. I must not deceive myself too much. I have no understanding of it and I am not sure that I believe in it. Perhaps it was a sin to kill the fish. I suppose it was even though I did it to keep me alive and feed many people.

But then everything is a sin. Do not think about sin. It is much too late for that and there are people who are paid to do it. Let them think about it. You were born to be a fisherman as the fish was born to be a fish. San Pedro was a fisherman as was the father of the great DiMaggio. The old man is so comfortable in the natural world that he believes he could never be lost at sea. He did not need a compass to tell him where southwest was. He only needed the feel of the trade wind and the drawing of the sail.

I better put a small line out with a spoon on it and try and get something to eat and drink for the moisture. But he could not find a spoon and his sardines were rotten. So he hooked a patch of yellow Gulf weed with the gaff as they passed and shook it so that the small shrimps that were in it fell onto the planking of the skiff. There were more than a dozen of them and they jumped and kicked like sand fleas.

The old man pinched their heads off with his thumb and forefinger and ate them chewing up the shells and the tails. They were very tiny but he knew they were nourishing and they tasted good. The old man made the sheet fast and jammed the tiller.

Old Man and the Sea Quotes

Sign in with Facebook Sign in options. Join Goodreads. Quotes tagged as "the-old-man-and-the-sea" Showing of 7.

This novel is famous for many reasons. It was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in , and also led to the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Literature to Hemingway in

Santiago says this to Manolin during their conversation in his shack. They speak of baseball before Manolin goes to fetch the sardines for bait for the next day, and Santiago's admiration for DiMaggio is apparent. DiMaggio becomes a symbol both of manhood and of overcoming strife for Santiago the next day while he is battling the great marlin. He cuts his hand and thinks about how Joe DiMaggio keeps playing despite the handicap of a bone spur; this gives him the strength to catch the fish. Manolin says this to Santiago before he goes to bed, comparing him to Joe DiMaggio in his unique skill.

The Old Man And The Sea Quotes

Sign in with Facebook Sign in options. Join Goodreads. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. It is better to be lucky. But I would rather be exact. Then when luck comes you are ready.

The Old Man and the Sea Quotes

JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. Everything about him was old except his eyes and they were the same color as the sea and were cheerful and undefeated. Usually when he smelled the land breeze he woke up and dressed to go and wake the boy. But tonight the smell of the land breeze came very early and he knew it was too early in his dream and went on dreaming to see the white peaks of the Islands rising from the sea and then he dreamed of the different harbours and roadsteads of the Canary Islands.

Find out more. Does the old man represent the author nearing the end of his career?

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The Old Man and the Sea Quotes and Analysis

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Speaking about Santiago, the narrator explains that despite his old age and going out to fish every day and returning without a catch for 84 days in a row.

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